Health Care

Veterinary Care/Vaccinations:

All horses should have vaccinations. Vaccinations last 30-35 days. Some vaccinations however, aren’t strong enough to resist a contagious horse (EHV, Strangles).

A healthy horse will display good symptoms on /h symptoms. When a horse is ill, he or she will display symptoms of the ailment it has. For example, a cut will have the symptoms of pain, bleeding, or swelling. You may want to contact a vet to make sure, and to ask how you should treat it.

Veterinarians can run tests to confirm an illness. Tests can be run on almost all illnesses except for visual ailments (cuts, thrush). Tests can be taken with samples of skin, feces, blood, urine, fur/coat, nasal swab, saliva, and and X-Ray and Ultrasound can be performed on the horse. After a minute wait, the vet will receive results of the test which can be given to the owner.

After tests are given, your vet will provide a prescription that you can pick up at the pharmacy and how to care for the illness the next couple days.

Vets can also perform surgery on a few ailments such as: a bone chip, broken cannon bone, a botulism procedure, and a castration procedure. Each surgery is a GUI multiple choice “test” to test the vets ability to perform a surgery. In each surgery there is often one wrong answer that could be fatal to the horse. It’s important that the vet recognizes this choice and remembers that it could be a fatal mistake.

Farrier

Your horse’s hooves are a big responsibility! They grow just like human nails. They need to be trimmed, cared for, and even supported with shoes! There are many types of shoes that you can put on your horses.

Here is a list of the shoe types and what they do:

Keg Shoe:

A keg shoe is your basic horse shoe, they last 8 weeks. Keg shoes are recommended for all horses that aren’t consistently showing and in light work.

Rim Shoe:

A rim shoe is similar to keg, just with a little extra grip. These shoes last 7 weeks, and are great for horses that are in a little bit more work. Rim shoes are great for faster gaits on soft grounds.

Aluminum Shoe:

Aluminum shoes are awesome shoes for horses in work. This speed increasing shoe is awesome for horses that compete in time based competitions. (SJ, XC, Eventing, Barrel Racing, Pole Bending) Aluminum is a lightweight metal, allowing for easier stride movement. These shoes last 4 weeks.

Rock n’ Roll Shoe:

This shoe is a type specifically shaped for dressage horses that are competing in high levels. Some shows on Equestriworlds may require this shoe type in order to compete. A rock n’ roll shoe lasts 5 weeks.

Race Plate Shoe:

A race plate is described exactly by the name. It’s for race horses on the track! This shoe gives a great speed boost. This shoe should only be used in races. This shoe lasts for 3 weeks, and if you are caught with these shoes on in any other competition other than a race, you could be disqualified.

Bar Shoe:

A bar shoe is a medical type shoe. This shoe specifically helps hoof bruising by offering support in specific places. This shoe should be on horses with a hoof bruise for no more than 6 weeks.

Remedial Bar Shoe:

A remedial bar shoe is another type of medical shoe that only lasts 2 weeks. This shoe can be used on horses recovering from white line disease.

Egg Bar Shoe:

This medical shoe is mainly used on horses with navicular syndrome. It can help alleviate pain from horses with a navicular. This shoe lasts 6 weeks.

Heart Bar Shoe:

A heart bar shoe is another medical type shoe. This is a very versatile shoe, offering support for hooves that are just not in good shape. This shoe can be used on laminitic horses, foundered horses, and horses healing from a quarter crack in the hoof. This shoe lasts 5 weeks.

No Shoes At All:

All horses are allowed to be barefoot if you choose! Farriers can trim a barefoot horse. 

A good farrier will assign a shoe type to your horse that is best fitting for the job that your horse does. Whether the horse competes heavily, shows lightly, gives light lessons, or sits in a pasture! If your farrier does not assign a shoe type, or applies the wrong shoe, your horse’s hooves could be jeopardized.

Pay close attention to your horse’s hoof growth with /h records and click [Farrier]. This will show the assigned shoe type, the type of shoes they have on now, and how many days since the last trim from the farrier. When your horse gets around 35-42 days since the last trim, you’ll want to call a farrier over to work on your horse.

Take precautions to prevent hoof issues. Use a hoof pick often. This will prevent illnesses like thrush and abscesses. Riding on hard blocks such as stone, cobblestone, any minerals found underground (diorite, granite, andesite) can be really bad for your horses’ hooves. Riding on such blocks can create hoof bruising and abscesses. Leading them over the blocks is okay, but avoid riding them on these blocks.

Keep your horse healthy to prevent illnesses related to weight. Being overweight or underweight are both bad for the horse. Not having enough nutrients can cause hooves to be dry and weak, creating white line disease. Too many nutrients can cause joint related problems such as navicular and laminitis.

If you suspect your horse is having hoof issues, call out for a farrier to come check them over!

List of blocks that have a chance of giving your horse a hoof bruise:

  • Cobblestone
  • Mossy Cobblestone
  • Sandstone
  • Red sandstone
  • Granite
  • Diorite / Pea Gravel
  • Andesite

Check out this video for more information!!

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